6089 Frantz Rd, Suite 105, Dublin, OH 43017 614-408-9939 info@CaregiverUSA.com M-F: 8-5 PM - Weekends: office closed - appointments only

Care Story about a Single Father with Cancer and His Little Boy

Hi this is Sarah again… So many interesting and wonderful things have happened since I last blogged. Where do I begin? It’s been weeks since I blogged about my career evolution from telecom company marketing manager…  to stay-at-home mom… to part-time Caregiver via CGUSA. If you’ve missed my last article, here’s a quick recap to get you up to speed.

Sarah looks after a little boy's father who has Cancer

I officially turned 46 years old and had a nice, low-key celebration at my favorite organic restaurant with my husband David, and our two teenage boys, Mike and Zach. Besides treating me to a delicious and nutritious special meal (I even splurged and had a piece of flourless cacao cake) all three pitched in to buy me a new, high-end vacuum cleaner, replete with all the crack and crevice nozzle attachments I’ve come to love as the aforementioned “neat freak.” I’ve been putting my incredibly efficient new appliance to good use not only at our suburban Columbus, Ohio home but also at Jim and Josh’s house. They are my new clients for whom I provide caregiving services. We connected through the electronic job board on the CaregiverUSA website www.caregiverusa.com.

Now to the heart of the story. I admit, when I first met Jim and Josh, their situation was dire, and I knew my job wasn’t going to be easy. Jim, age 40, a divorced single dad who works as a wastewater specialist for the county water department, was diagnosed with stage 2 lymphoma about five months ago. He is the father of an adorable five-year-old boy, Josh, and shares joint custody with his ex-wife, Brittany, who lives about an hour’s drive away.

Jim’s doctors are treating his cancer aggressively and have been giving him several courses of chemotherapy over one to three days at a time. Each course of chemo makes Jim very tired and unable to do much of anything, especially cook for and keep up with Josh, who is a typical little “bundle of energy”, to be sure. Naturally, Jim was feeling guilty he can’t take care of Josh as he should during or shortly following the chemo. It didn’t help his frame of mind that for about three months prior to my arrival, Jim was depending on neighbors to feed and watch Josh while he was “out of commission”. Jim realized the neighbors have their own lives, with irregular schedules, and he needed to bring somebody qualified into the house right away. Leaving Josh with the neighbors was a temporary band-aid.

After trading several internal messages on the CGUSA site, Jim and I had our first candid phone conversation about his situation and the pressing need for my services. It was heart-breaking to me, as a parent, to realize that despite his own life-threatening health issues, Jim was most concerned about losing custody of his son. I could tell that Jim “being there” for Josh was essential to both the father and son’s well-being. Jim didn’t want to lose influence over his son’s rearing during this crucial phase of the boy’s life.

Generally, Jim is not a big talker. On this initial phone call, he was pouring out his fears about disrupting Josh’s routine too much, which could aggravate “acting out” episodes over “something’s wrong with Daddy”. Most of all, Jim wanted to stick to his pre-illness custody schedule as much as possible, rather than let Brittany watch Josh while he was sick. Jim “did not want to let on too much” about the seriousness of his condition, in case Brittany would try to “take Josh away from me, and just leave me with some visitation rights”.

While internally I was struggling with my own emotions upon hearing this truly sad scenario, I chose to be understanding but professional, recommending that I come into his home four days a week for six hours each day, with any needed adjustments made to accommodate Jim’s chemo treatments. While I knew Jim was desperate and would probably agree to almost any hourly rate, I stuck with my original quote, displayed on my CGUSA profile, of $25 an hour for cooking, housekeeping, organization, errands and, most importantly, child care. I felt this was reasonable given my experience and skills sets, and it also made it worth my while as I seek to build up my own sons’ college tuition fund.

My first day on the job was daunting. I didn’t know exactly what to expect, but I felt (and still do feel) it is my purpose and mission to be there and help Jim and Josh through this distressing time. Anyway, Jim answers the doorbell and he is tall about 6 foot, but very pale and frail-looking, with thinning light brown hair and blue eyes. Despite his obvious fatigue, he has a pleasant, accommodating personality. In a surprisingly strong voice, he calls for Josh to come out and meet “your new nanny”. “Josh, come see, Sarah says she’s even more fun than Mary Poppins!” Jim jokes.

Sarah shares how caregiving is a fulfilling and rewarding career for her

“Great,” I think, as this tow-headed little fireball races toward me from around the corner, “Now I have to live up to Mary Poppins standards. What a let-down when he realizes my umbrella doesn’t carry me off to the skies!”

However, fear of not flying was the least of my initial concerns. There were dirty, smelly dishes in the sink. The house seemed as if it hadn’t had a good cleaning in at least six months. Toys were strewn everywhere. After talking a few minutes, I realized their usual dinner consisted of order-in pepperoni and bell pepper pizzas (at least the peppers are vegetables) or fast-food burgers and fries.

Like Mary Poppins, it was time for me to work my own brand of magic to transform Jim and Josh’s living situation. Day after day, I would happily scrub and scour tubs, corners, and cobwebs, and revealed in more opportunities to use my fantastic birthday vacuum cleaner. I did an inventory of Josh’s toys and created a color-coded bin system so he, Jim, and I could retrieve and stash them easily.

Practically speaking, I agreed to make the delivery pizza only an occasional dinner treat. Instead, I took the grocery money Jim gave me and whipped up some tasty, nutritious healthy meals. Like the former junk-food eaters in my own family, Jim and Josh quickly learned to love my famous “zucchini with roasted pistachios” not to mention “baked chicken with sweet potato and green beans casserole.” As Josh says: “Gulp-alicious!”

Clearly, the biggest challenge of all was handling Josh’s roller-coaster emotions. He is such a cute, smart little guy, but it didn’t take much to turn him into a screaming banshee! He threw a fit when he didn’t get his customary “sprinkle cheese” on his sandwich. He cried and carried on when he couldn’t see Daddy sleeping in the bedroom. He grabbed the Comet when my back was turned for just a second and started sprinkling it all over the furniture – now that was a clean-up job I actually didn’t like!

Fortunately, Jim and I discussed in advance how he wanted Josh disciplined. Besides, Josh’s personality reminded me of Zach when he was that age, so I had a few tricks up my sleeve. I even told Josh funny stories about my boys when they were little – finding a frog in the inflatable swimming pool; Mikey’s big hit in T-ball, etc. without giving Josh too many ideas!

Today, I just returned from Jim and Josh’s house. I’m thrilled to report Jim is responding very well to the chemo. Without the added worry of cooking and caring for Josh, Jim has been able to rest more comfortably and focus positive energy on his recovery. Josh’s tantrums have started to subside now that a sense of order has been restored.

I’m so touched Jim introduces me as a “godsend” to his family. Besides the housekeeping, cooking and childcare services I provide, Jim credits my “optimism and positive attitude” with making the biggest difference in their lives. He says he is grateful to me for getting them through this “sludgy situation”, and plans to recommend CaregiverUSA to his friends and his HR department once he is able to return to work. I’m hoping that will be in the next couple months. I’ve developed a real affection for Jim and Josh, and plan to visit or help out once in a while, even after they resume their regular routines and I move on to care for another client family.

By now, you know I’m not “just about the money”, although I am happy our college fund is growing week after week. This experience with Jim and Josh has helped me find renewed purpose and a heightened sense of contentment. I would never have imagined that I’ll be sharing my care story about a single father with cancer and his little boy, let alone be blessed with the opportunity to help them through a tough time.

With everything I’ve done in my life thus far, I’ve discovered that caregiving is what I do best. When I nurture other people, I am nurturing my higher self to be the best person I can be. I’ve found my true calling.

Caregiver USA Corporation’s Mission Stemmed from Personal Experience

Jinji and Shinji Yue’s decision to start Caregiver USA Corporation was rooted in personal experience with caregiving. Both men helped to care for their father when he was dying of cancer, and Jinji also helped care for his then future wife’s mother in her final days battling lung cancer.

“I was 16 when my father was diagnosed with liver cancer,” Jinji said. “Shinji was 20 and in the army, and he would get some nights off to come visit and help, but I was there every day.”

The family lived in Singapore, and there, at that time, most cancer care was delivered in a hospital inpatient setting.

“It was still very important for us to be there with him as much as possible,” Jinji said. “His chemotherapy treatments were very harsh, and he suffered a great deal from side effects, including extreme fatigue and frequent vomiting. We did our best to keep him as comfortable as possible.”

As they watched their father struggle and suffer, Jinji and Shinji suffered too.

“Caregiving is emotional,” Jinji said. “It’s very tiring, and our anxiety level was very high. During my dad’s first round of cancer treatment, I was in denial. The year before, my grandfather had passed, but he had been old, so while the loss was sad, it was expected at that point. But my dad should have had many more years of life left ahead of him. He had always been the pillar of my life. I thought he would recover.”

While initially hoping the cancer treatments would be successful, Jinji and Shinji and their mother saw growing evidence to the contrary.

“We saw his slow decline,” Jinji said. “Then, in his final two months, he was very frail and was in and out of consciousness. He died about eight months after his diagnosis. I was 17. It took me years after he was gone to accept the reality of losing him.”

About five years after losing his father, Jinji was a student at Ohio State University, working towards his bachelor of science in mechanical engineering.

“I received a call from my girlfriend, Siewling,” Jinji said. “She still lived in Singapore at the time. She called and told me her mom had just been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and had less than one year to live. I decided to take time off from school to go home and help care for her.”

Jinji was able to apply what he had learned through his personal experience with caregiving to help Siewling and her family.

“I saw the condition Siewling’s mother was in,” Jinji said, “And I Siewling and her brothers were in the same shoes I had been in. I suspected she had less than a year to live, maybe six months. She was in the hospital a lot, and I spent a lot of time there with her and her family. I tried to give advice and help out however I could.”

Fast forward to the present, and Jinji and Shinji are applying what they learned through their personal experiences with caregiving to help others.

“Having had the opportunity to care for two people who were dying let me appreciate tremendously what caregiving is all about,” Jinji said. “When we started Caregiver USA, we did so because there are a lot of people who need help with caregiving. In our experience, we just had family members rotating constantly, with no extra help, and we really could have used more assistance. Sometimes you just need a break. We wanted to offer more choices to find help. And we wanted to help ensure access to high quality help.

“We created a web-based platform, bookacare.com that allows those seeking healthcare services for themselves or loved ones to find, evaluate, hire and review qualified, experienced and accredited health-care professionals. Our services can be accessed conveniently online from a computer or mobile applications and through social media. Information is readily accessible via iPhones and tablets. We even provide the opportunity for caregivers and care seekers to review one another. Care seekers can enjoy peace of mind in hiring a caregiver who has received positive reviews, is insured and has passed an extensive background check. The caregivers who get the best reviews will be hired the most often, so they benefit too. “ Care seekers also can get to know their caregivers better before hiring them and welcoming them into their homes.

One way to improve the quality of caregivers available is to ensure they receive fair financial compensation.

“You get what you pay for,” Jinji said. “Many home care agencies have a very high turnover because nurses and nurses’ aides can barely earn a living wage. They receive inadequate pay and no benefits, and most of them operate completely independently, never interacting with their professional peers..

“Through our business model, we are able to help our caregivers receive fair compensation and feel valued. We empower them to perform at their best. As independent contractors, they are their own bosses. We also provide a lot of training to both our contracted caregivers and our full-time employees, and we can provide an office environment that encourages team interaction. This supports the goal of all of our caregivers knowing and living our core mission.”

Through bookacare.com and our brick and mortar agencies, Caregiver USA aims not only to lighten the caregiving load for families, but to provide a rewarding professional experience for its caregivers.

“The caregiving experience I had made me realize the importance of caregiving, its challenges and also its emotional rewards,” Jinji said. “Our mission is very simple. We want to create value and happiness in caring for others. You want to be happy when providing care. The drive to do so has to come from within. But then to avoid burning out in doing so, you need to be supported and rewarded.”

 

Caregiving – a Rewarding Career

Hi, it’s me — Christine. I told you last time that I was using some of the skills I learned in Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) training in my new career as a caregiver entrepreneur with CGUSA. I’ve gotta tell you, it’s been going great so far!

Not that caring for John, 72, with Alzheimer’s isn’t a challenge. It definitely is, but nothing I can’t handle. And I know I am really making a difference in not only his life, but his wife Anna’s, 65, whom I told you last time, has high blood pressure and diabetes and was becoming exhausted under the stress of trying to take care of both her health and John’s.

Then there’s the relief I’ve been giving to Mary Jane. She’s John and Anna’s daughter — I am guessing she is about 45 years old. Mary Jane has a really full plate with a high-powered managerial job, a husband, three kids and two dogs. She lives two hours away and had been commuting back and forth between her family and her parents’ every weekend for three months, until I started working with them.

Mary Jane is the one who actually hired me through the CGUSA website, and now she, along with her five brothers and sisters all living in other states, are all chipping in to pay the cost of my coming in to John and Anna’s home to help out. I mentioned last time I am going over there twice a week, every Tuesday and Thursday, from 10 am to 2 pm., and getting paid $18 an hour. This is the rate I chose and the hours I picked from the git-go, so I am able to get my kids up (Lucas, 6 , and Mia, almost 2), give them breakfast, and drop them off to school or – in Mia’s case — to daycare or my Mom’s

But more about John. He really is a sweet man, but he gets a little flustered and upset with himself at times because he can’t remember things like he used to. You know, little stuff like where he put his reading glasses, or his coffee cup, or the different states he and Anna’s six children live in. When that happens, he just kind of gets frazzled and a little upset, but it doesn’t take much to get him calmed down, because I locate these items pretty easily (he isn’t moving around that much) and I just tell him that son Jack moved to Illinois from Ohio only a few months back, so it’s not that easy to remember where Jack is living now – no big deal. 🙂

John and I also “connect” through humor. He knows he has Alzheimer’s – he remembers it some of the time, not all, of course. Sometimes, when he has his good, lucid moments, he makes jokes about his condition. I just smile. Then he tells me an old joke off the top of his head. Sure, some of them are corny, and he has repeated several of them more than once, but the jokes lift John’s mood and get him engaged and thinking, so I always giggle no matter how many times I’ve heard the punchline. And, actually, some of the jokes really are funny. “Have you heard the one about the three Irishmen in the bar who…”

Wait a minute, I’m getting too carried away with this! 🙂

John’s Alzheimer’s is in the early stages. Mary Jane told me he was only diagnosed less than a year ago, after a scary episode where he couldn’t find his way back home after taking a walk. Like most patients in the beginning of the disease, John’s long-term memory is still pretty good. He can talk about the “old days,” back in the ‘50s all day long. It’s his short-term memory — things that happened in the last few days, or weeks — that are giving him trouble.

Right now, because I am so new as a CNA (Certified Nurse Assistant), I told you before I wanted to kind of ease my way into my new caregiver career, as opposed to just jumping in feet first; (I’m the same way when I get in a swimming pool; I creep slowly into the deeper water, so I can get used to it. No cannonballs for me!) But now that I have been working with this family, I know they have other needs that require more skilled medical training.

Pretty soon, I am going to upgrade my services to match what my CNA certification provides, for example, giving John a bath, working with his physician or a Registered Nurse (RN) manager to provide some kind of specialized Alzheimer’s memory care stimulation. Once my current contract term is over and up for renewal, I’ll be asking for a raise to $20 an hour for these additional services. Mary Jane has already said she is more than happy to pay it.  

Currently, I am doing mostly companion-type, non-medical work, such as light housekeeping, meal prep, and making sure John takes his meds and “stays out of trouble” while Anna lies down to rest, goes to a doctor’s appointment, or just meets her lady friends for lunch once in a while.

Anna says over and over how much she appreciates me being there. When I arrived for my first visit three weeks ago, she was so worried and stressed out. Every little thing seemed to upset her. Now, I am seeing her smile a lot more, and able to relax. Knowing I have something to do with giving her peace of mind makes me feel really good about my work.

Speaking of work, I am still a manager at the fast-food place I talked about earlier. I mostly work early evening/night shifts and Daniel watches the kids. It’s a little much right now, balancing two jobs and family life, but since this is going so well with John and Anna, I plan to give notice in the next couple weeks at the restaurant so I can expand my caregiver hours to maybe 16 hours a week.

Did I mention the CaregiverUSA apps and website payment system are really awesome? It is so easy – here’s how it works. The care seeker and caregiver agree on a certain amount to be paid during a given time period, say a week, and then the care seeker pays the entire amount for the week upfront, ( i.e. escrows it ) via a third party credit card handling company affiliated with the CGUSA website. The caregiver (that would be me) can then log on and see the money in there. Once the care seeker gives the official OK, the money is transferred to the caregiver’s bank account, minus the 10 percent service charge I mentioned in my last post. In truth, CGUSA gets paid less than 2% of these payment transactions, the bulk goes to the bank handling escrow and payment.

Anyway… considering how much I am liking my new caregiver role in the home healthcare industry, I feel inspired to go for my Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) certification at some point and move up in my career. I may even decide to add a second family (besides John and Anna) depending on what is going on with my own family and their schedules. Seriously, joining the CaregiverUSA network is one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life so far, other than marrying Daniel and giving birth to Lucas and Mia of course!  

If you are looking for a career that has flexibility in hours, and can even allow you to set your own price for services, I totally encourage you to explore CaregiverUSA. With a website like this that can help you find work (and get paid) so easily, you can have more work-home life balance and feel great about truly being able to help other people as well.  

Caregiver Spotlight

Meet Shonda,

 Shonda is a dedicated and hard-working STNA for Caregiver USA. She loves having the opportunity to be the best part of someone’s worst day. She has worked in the health care field for over ten years. Shonda worked in a hospital setting for about six years. She realized that she wanted to provide more one-on-one care so she transitioned to home health. Her future goal is to become a Registered Nurse. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her two daughters! Caregiver USA is very appreciative of Shonda and everything she has and will accomplish for herself.

For more information about Caregiver USA services visit http://www.CaregiverUSA.com or call 614-408-9939.

The importance of Patient Safety

Prevention of Falls in the Elderly

How many of you are caring for the elderly, or looking for someone who can? It’s not easy. There are so many things to look out for, and so many challenges to face.

One of the biggest challenges is prevention of falls in the elderly. There are many other things to talk about when it comes to caring for them but accidental falling can be a nightmare. So how do we prevent falls in the elderly?

We know that falls, and the resulting complications, can be very dangerous but they are also one of the most common risk factors-it’s just too easy to let them happen. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, “One out of three older adults (those aged 65 or older) falls each year but less than half talk to their healthcare providers about it.” So this problem is not only widespread, it is also hidden. Caregivers end up in a difficult position of having to prevent things before they can happen.

So what can we do?

Many risk factors and prevention have been identified in medical and healthcare literature. This might go a long way in saving the lives of our loved ones. Some of these risk factors are intrinsic and you may need professional help before you can notice them, for example, examination for back problems. Other factors are environmental and to some extent cannot be controlled easily. But there are other factors that are within the power of caregivers-both formal and informal-to deal with.

Medication

Forewarned is forearmed. Some medicines can make a person dizzy or drowsy, of affect balance and co-ordination. This applies to everyone, not just the elderly. Caregivers might not always be in a good position to know this-medical confidentiality and lacking pharmaceutical knowledge might hinder this. But the elderly or their legal representatives should be able to ask their doctors/pharmacists to identify those medicines that increase the risk of falling. The doctors especially, should be able to tell you whether any particular medicine is a risk to any particular patient.

Footwear

Remember that awful, horrible feeling when you wrench an ankle wearing thick soles on uneven ground? Think of this, only much worse, if an elderly person’s feet wobble too much wearing high heels with no ankle support. Backless shoes, even slippers with smooth soles, all pose a variety of footwear-related risks. In Asia, another type of footwear to worry about are the communal slippers used for bathrooms. There are many ways footwear can be unsafe-they can interfere with a safe and proper gait, they can be too slippery, or they can be too large and be a tripping hazard. We should ensure our elderly not only have proper and safe footwear for going out, but also for using within the home-this is especially important for bathroom slippers since the elderly may need to access a potentially wet floor late at night, possibly without wearing glasses, while urgently rushing to answer the call of nature.

Tripping/Slipping Hazards

We already mentioned smooth-soled shoes as a slipping hazard. But there’s more. The bathroom is a particularly dangerous place for elderly when it comes to a fall risk. The floor can be smooth and wet, and placing loose rugs may do nothing to solve this problem-they might even increase the risk of slipping. Bathrooms often also have little curbs, especially at the shower areas. Try to use rugs with a rubberized underside, to prevent elderly users from slipping to them, and of course try to keep the floors dry. Rough surfaces or rubber mats are another potential safety measure.

But that’s just the bathroom. Falls can happen anywhere in the house or outside it, so watch out also for objects cluttering the floor, uneven ground, slopes, and smooth surfaces.

Assistance

Now, this might be a bit difficult. So far, we’ve talked about removing problems. That’s not expensive. But sometimes we may need to make some investments for long term. We don’t need to wrap our loved ones in tons of cotton wool everywhere they go, but it would help if grab rails or other supports and installed in the important areas of the home (bathroom for example). Walking aides should also be chosen carefully. It should not be too heavy, and should be adjusted to the correct height so that a cane-assisted walking posture does not itself turn out to be a falling risk.

Diet

Protein, calcium, essential vitamins and water. All these sound very commonsensical. However, what an elderly person needs for a suitable diet may not be the same as what healthy middle-aged adults need. Some changes are common to all elderly-for example, switching to softer foods. Moreover, a healthy diet can go a long way to prevent numerous other problems that increase the risk of falling. Diet also needs to cater to a person’s specific medical issues.

If you or a loved one are looking into home care options please visit http://www.CaregiverUSA.com or call 614-408-9939.

February is National Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Low Vision Awareness Month

Understanding AMD
AMD is the gradual but persistent breakdown of the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision needed for seeing objects clearly. Over time, this can affect the ability to read, drive, identify faces, watch television, navigate stairs and perform a suite of other daily tasks. For many adults, this visual deterioration occurs in one eye and may eventually form in the other.

There are two types of AMD – “dry” and “wet”. The majority of people with AMD have the “dry” form, which is less severe and develops gradually. It is important to carefully monitor central vision when diagnosed with AMD, because it can quickly develop into a more serious condition – wet AMD.

Risk Factors
According to vision experts, the top five risk factors for AMD are:

  • Being over the age of 50
  • Family history
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension

Unfortunately, many people don’t realize they have a macular problem until they notice blurred or distorted vision. If you or someone in your family is at an increased risk for AMD, see an eye care provider as soon as possible to undergo an eye exam. Early detection of AMD is the most important step to preventing serious vision loss.

Treatment Options
There is no treatment for dry AMD but doctors have found a link between nutrition and the progression of dry AMD. Introducing low-fat foods and dark leafy greens into your diet can slow vision loss and may even increase your overall wellness.

If wet AMD is detected early, laser treatment is a popular method to help prevent severe vision loss.

As we observe National AMD/Low Vision Awareness Month, take this opportunity to reduce your risk of developing AMD. Avoid smoking, exercise regularly, maintain normal blood pressure and cholesterol, and eat a healthy diet that includes green leafy vegetables and fish. For extra motivation, find a friend, partner or neighbor to engage in healthy habits with you.

 

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Credits: http://whatislowvision.org/2014/02/19/february-is-national-age-related-macular-degeneration-and-low-vision-awareness-month/

Caregiver Spotlight

Meet Shonda,

 Shonda is a dedicated and hard-working STNA for Caregiver USA. She loves having the opportunity to be the best part of someone’s worst day. She has worked in the health care field for over ten years. Shonda worked in a hospital setting for about six years. She realized that she wanted to provide more one-on-one care so she transitioned to home health. Her future goal is to become a Registered Nurse. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her two daughters! Caregiver USA is very appreciative of Shonda and everything she has and will accomplish for herself.

For more information about Caregiver USA services visit http://www.CaregiverUSA.com or call 614-408-9939.

Fun Activities for You and Your Grand Kids

Wondering what you can do at home to keep the kids entertained on the weekends while you kick back with a nice cup of coffee? You’re in luck! Edible play dough is safe, easy and can be made in just 20 minutes.

What you’ll need:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 1/2 cups white flour
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 1 tablespoon cream of tartar
  • 2 packages of Kool-Aid
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Once you have what you need:

  1. Bring the water to a boil in a sauce pan; remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the flour, salt, cream of tartar, and soft drink mix in a large bowl; stir the vegetable oil into the flour mixture using a spoon, not a whisk. Pour the hot water into the bowl and continue stirring. When the dough is cool enough to handle, turn it onto a lightly-floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Store unused portions in refrigerator.
  3. Grab a cup of coffee and visit Caregiver USA Facebook or Blog as a daily resource for local events, activities, health and much more!

 

Was this an interesting article for you? We have more! Subscribe to our newsletter to read useful care stories, receive special offers and updates. We would love for you to be a part of our community, click the link to join us: http://eepurl.com/dgz6LP

What’s happening in Columbus?

The Gallery hop presented by the “Short North Alliance” is happening this evening 4-10 PM. This event is completely free!

On the first Saturday of each month, thousands of visitors converge on High Street in the Short North Arts District. Visitors celebrate art throughout the evening with new gallery exhibitions, street performers, special events, food, and drinks throughout the District.

If you’re interested in things like Fiber Art, Parks & Nature, Culinary, Ceramic, Theater & Performance, Digital, Exhibition, Photography, Wine tasting, Design, Sculpture, Music, Festival, Visual Art then this is the place for you and your loved ones to be.

If you have loved ones at home that need assistant when you are away please visit http://www.CaregiverUSA.com or Call us at 614-408-9939.

For more information about events happenings in Columbus please visit http://www.columbusmakesart.com/event/32ffc-gallery-hop-february/